Trends in nutrient concentration and load for streams in the Mississippi River Basin, 1974-94

by Dee L. Lurry

Publisher: USGS, Publisher: U.S. Geological Survey, Branch of Information Services [distributor] in Austin, Tex, Denver, CO

Written in English
Published: Pages: 62 Downloads: 244
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Places:

  • Mississippi River Valley.

Subjects:

  • Nutrient pollution of water -- Mississippi River Valley.,
  • Water -- Phosphorus content -- Mississippi River Valley.,
  • Water -- Nitrogen content -- Mississippi River Valley.

Edition Notes

The following list provide access to information on streamflow and annual net nutrient flux for five large subbasins comprising the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin. The information is provided for the period – with confidence intervals. SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models were used to relate instream nutrient loads to sources and factors influencing the transport of nutrients in the Missouri River Basin. Agricultural inputs from fertilizer and manure were the largest nutrient sources throughout a large part of the basin, although atmospheric and urban inputs were important sources in some. Nutrient loads from the Missouri River Basin to the Mississippi River also decreased by approximately 16% for nitrogen and 33% for phosphorus as a result of attenuation in reservoirs and lakes. Approximately half of that attenuation occurred in just eight of the largest (by surface area) water bodies (seven reservoirs and one natural lake).Cited by: Trends in streamflow and concentration of total nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate, ammonia, total phosphorus, orthophosphorus, and suspended sediment were determined for the period from to at selected stream sites in the Missouri River Basin. Flow-adjusted trends in concentration (the trends that would have occurred in the absence of natural changes in streamflow) and non-flow-adjusted.

management alternatives and their water quality implications, and for establishing stronger federal inter-agency and inter-state coordination and leadership in addressing Mississippi River basin water quality issues (Box lists key findings and recommendations from those reports).All recommendations made in those reports are within the context of the existing CWA and other existing legislation. F. Fallon, J.D., , A retrospective look at pesticides in streams and bed sediment in part of the Upper Mississippi River Basin, [abs.], Minnesota Water Changing patterns of power and responsibilityImplications for water policy, Minneapolis, Minnesota, May , Water Resources Research Center, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, p. of the Upper Mississippi River Basin, Minnesota and Wisconsin-Pesticides in Streams, Streambed Sediment, and Ground Water, , U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Investigations Report 97 . The Lower Tennessee River Basin and the Mobile River Basin are two such study units. The U.S. Geological Survey began both of these studies in This poster presents estimated yields of nutrients in both study units. Yields were calculated for the water year using nutrient loads.

Baseline values displayed on bar charts for the Mississppi-Atchafalya Delta site (defined as the sum of loads from the Mississippi River at St. Francisville and the Atchafalaya River at Melville) include the – averages, a percent reduction line from this value (as identified by Mississippi River Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient. Streamflow and Nutrient Flux of the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin and Subbasins for the Period of Record Through Streamflow and Nutrient Delivery to the Gulf of Mexico. Streamflow and nutrient delivery to the Gulf of Mexico are provided through water year , which includes the period of record through September Aulenbach noted that the information will be used by the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrients Task Force, which currently is conducting a science assessment of the causes of hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The report includes information for the 5 major subbasins that comprise the entire Mississippi River Basin. Information on trends in nitrogen and phosphorus loads through at the outlet of the Mississippi River Basin was recently reported by the EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB) in their report and recommendations on Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia issues, p., MB.

Trends in nutrient concentration and load for streams in the Mississippi River Basin, 1974-94 by Dee L. Lurry Download PDF EPUB FB2

Trends in Nutrient Concentration and Load for Streams in the Mississippi River Basin, –94 By D.L. Lurry and D.D. Dunn Abstract Trends in nutrient concentration and load are computed for 40 stations on 24 streams in the Mississippi River Basin. The drainage area of the Mississippi Basin covers about 42 percent of the.

Trends in nutrient concentration and load for streams in the Mississippi River Basin, Austin, Tex.: USGS ; Denver, CO: U.S. Geological Survey, Branch of. Trends in nutrient concentration and load for streams in the Mississippi River Basin, / by D.L.

Lurry and D.D. Dunn ; prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Gulf of Mexico Program, Nutrient Enrichment Issue : Dee L. Lurry. The concentration of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), dissolved nitrate-N, Total-N (TN), dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP), total phosphorus (TP), dissolved silicate-Si (DSi) and their ratios in the world's largest rivers are examined using a global data base that includes 37% of the earth's watershed area and half its by: U.S.

Geological Survey (USGS) surface-water sampling sites in the Mobile River Basin were reviewed for available nutrient data for the period Sites having sufficient nutrient data were evaluated for long-term trends in nutrient concentrations and nutri­ent transport was calculated for selected basins.

Browse the USGS Publication Warehouse Trends in nutrient concentration and load for streams in the Mississippi River basin, Water-Resources Investigations Report Analysis of bottom sediment to estimate nonpoint-source phosphorus loads for in Hillsdale Lake, northeast Kansas,Water-Resources Investigations.

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) surface-water sampling sites in the Mobile River Basin were reviewed for available nutrient data for the period Sites having sufficient nutrient data were evaluated for long-term trends in nutrient concentrations and nutrient transport was calculated for selected basins.

Trends in Nutrient and Sediment Concentrations in Streams and Rivers of the United States, Nutrients in rivers, streams, and aquifers in the United States Annual and Spring Estimates of Nutrient Delivery to the Gulf of Mexico from the Mississippi River Basin.

In theagricultural setting of the Mississippi River drainage, farmersincrease the productivity and yield of their crops by use of chemicalfertilizers. If more fertilizers are applied than are used by thecrops, they can move into ground and surface waters and become a majorsource of nutrients in rivers.

Nitrogen and Phosphorus Pollution in the Mississippi River Basin: Findings of the Wadeable Streams Assessment Introduction Beginning as a tiny outlet stream in northern Minnesota at Lake Itasca, the Mississippi River is the largest river in the United States and drains all or part of 31 states and more than 1, square miles of the country’s.

The highest load of suspended sediments is from the Missouri watershed (58 mt km 2 yr −1), which is also the largest among the six major sub-basins. The Ohio watershed delivers the largest load of water (38%). The Upper Mississippi has the largest total nitrogen load (32%) and yield ( kg TN km 2 yr −1).Cited by:   Trends in nutrient concentration and load for streams in the Mississippi River Basin, – U.S.

Geological Survey, Water-Resources Investigations Report 97 Cited by: Mean annual streamflow and nutrient inflows for the Mississippi River, Atchafalaya River, Old River Outflow Channel, and Red River, – Abstract.

Trends in nutrient concentration and load are computed for 40 stations on 24 streams in the Mississippi River Basin. Trends in Nutrient Concentration and Load for Streams in the Mississippi River Basin, U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report Maupin MA, Ivahnenko T.

Nutrient Loadings to Streams of the Continental United States From Municipal and Industrial by: Trends in the water-quality constituents were evaluated for both concentration and load.

Concentration is the amount of the constituent in the stream. Load is the mass of the constituent transported past the sampling point in a stream during a period of time.

All of the water-quality and aquatic-ecology trends reported in this mapper are normalized for climatic variability. Long-term nutrient concentration trends and load variations at six monitoring stations on four canals in the Southern Indian River Lagoon (Florida, USA) were evaluated using the Estimate Trend.

Nutrient Control Actions for Improving Water Quality in the Mississippi River Basin and Northern Gulf of Mexico. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: / Percentage of stream nutrient load delivered to the Gulf of Mexico.

This figure illustrates the geographic differences within watersheds in percentages of. Streamflow and Nutrient Delivery from the Mississippi River Basin to the Gulf of Mexico, Toxic Substances Hydrology Program headline on the report - Streamflow and Nutrient Fluxes of the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin and Subbasins for the Period of Record ThroughU.S.

Geological Survey Open-File Report Nitrogen from the Mississippi River Basin is believed to be at least partly responsible for the large zone of oxygen-depleted water that develops in the Gulf of Mexico each summer.

Historical data show that concentrations of nitrate in the Mississippi River and some of its tributaries have increased by factors of 2 to more than 5 since the Cited by: Concentration of chlorophyll a (chl-a) as a measure of phytoplankton response to nutrient inputs can follow seasonal patterns with cyclical variation in temperature and light changes throughout.

there is a change in response to nutrients as a river transitions from a nutrient-poor to a more nutrient-and sediment-rich watershed, where light limitation may be an issue (as is the case with the main stem of the Red River).

The three Upper Mississippi Basin sites were included in the monitoring efforts. By repeating. The USGS provides scientific information to support management actions intended to reduce excess nutrients in the Mississippi River Basin and Hypoxia in the Gulf of has participated in the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force since its inception in The information USGS provides includes.

Abstract. Nutrient and sediment data collected at sites by Federal and State agencies from to were analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey to determine trends in concentrations and loads for selected rivers and streams that drain into the northwestern Gulf of Mexico from the south-central United States, specifically from the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf.

Nutrient mass balance and trends, Mobile River Basin, Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi Article in JAWRA Journal of the American Water Resources Association 40(3). Streamflow and Nutrient Flux of the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin and Subbasins Through Water Year Streamflow and Nutrient Fluxes of the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin and Subbasins for the Period of Record Through U.S.

Geological Survey Open-File Report USGS Continuous Nutrient Monitoring in the Mississippi River Basin video. The Mississippi River is the fourth largest river in the world and with its tributaries, the Mississippi drains all or part of 31 States or about 41% of the continental United States.

This central artery of the US connects the Great Lakes to the Heartland to the Gulf. Nutrient concentration and flux in the Mississippi River have increased substantially over the last century because of changes in land use, climate, hydrology, and river management and engineering.

Regional differences in trends were evident, with stable nutrient loads from the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico, but commonly decreasing N loads and increasing P loads in Chesapeake Bay. Compared to global rivers, coastal rivers of the conterminous U.S have somewhat lower TN yields and slightly higher TP yields, but similarities exist Cited by: Nutrient Control Actions for Improving Water Quality in the Mississippi River Basin and Northern Gulf of Mexico Committee On The Mississippi River and the Clean Water Act; User's Guide: Mississippi River Water Quality and the Clean Water Act (54 pp, MB) Report in Brief: Mississippi River Water Quality and the Clean Water Act (4 pp, K).

Streamflow and water-quality data, including concentrations of nutrients, metals, and pesticides, were collected from October through September at six sites in the Treyburn development study area.

A review of water-quality data for streams in and near a 5,acre planned, mixed-use development in the Falls Lake watershed in the upper Neuse River Basin of North Carolina indicated. The annual loads of C,N,P, silicate, total suspended sediment (mass) and their yields (mass area–1) were estimated for six watersheds of the Mississippi River Basin (MRB) using water quality and.Nutrient loads and trends were calculated by using the log-linear multiple-regression model, LOADEST.

Loads were calculated for water years for 22 sites in the Sacramento Basin, 15 sites in the San Joaquin Basin, and 6 sites in the Santa Ana Basin. The average annual load of total nitrogen and total phosphorus for in.View or download the PDF ( mb).

Abstract. Trends in streamflow and concentration of total nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate, ammonia, total phosphorus, orthophosphorus, and suspended sediment were determined for the period from to at selected stream sites in the Missouri River Basin.